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20121116
20121116
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
connell, who's the senate minority leader, he's taking a tougher stand than even boehner. let's listen to both of those positions. >> let's be clear. an opening bid of $1.6 trillion in new taxes just isn't serious. it's more than simpson/bowles or any other bipartisan commission has called for. it's been unanimously rejected in the house and senate. it's twice as much as the white house agreed to last summer during the debt ceiling talks, and looked at in the context of the spending cuts yet to be implemented, it amounts to about 20 cents in cuts for every new dollar in tax hikes. in other words, no cuts at all. it's a joke. a joke. >> we right away say 98% of americans are not going to see their taxes go up. 97% of small businesses are not going to see their taxes go up. if we get that in place, we are actually removing half of the fiscal cliff. half of the danger to our economy is removed by that single step. >> okay. so is it a joke, or as the democrats would say, the math isn't adding up? let's look at the issue of deficit reduction. the democrats say the -- let's say if you cut loopholes
the house speaker john boehner, the president, you can see him sitting there. let's listen to the president. thank them for their time and i think we're all aware that we have some urgent business to do. we have to make sure that taxes don't go up on middle class families and that our economy remains strong and creating jobs and that's an agenda that democrats and republicans and independents, people all across the country share. our challenge is to make sure that we are able to cooperate together, work together, find some common ground, make some tough compromises and build some consensus to do the people's business and what folks are looking for and i think all of us agree on this is they want to see that we are focused on them and not focused on our politics. my hope is this is a fruitful process where we will come to agreement that will reduce our deficit in a balanced way. i want to thank the leadership for coming and with that wool get to work. thank you very much, everybody. wait, wait, excuse me, there is actually one other point that i wanted to make. that is that my understanding
points. >> yes, i ran fast, mandy. earlier today, john boehner, the speaker of the house, spoke. the markets spiked. as you hear this sound bite, we're going to show you the dow intraday, what it did, and where you see the spike. it's a spike of more than 100 points. that's when speaker boehner spoke. listen to this. >> i believe that we can do this and avert the fiscal cliff that's right in front of us today. >> is this really what led to today's midday turn around, or was it something else? let's talk about that. quincy crosby joins us. mark spellman and kevin carone. quincy, is it that simple? they came out, they used the word constructive, framework, corner stone, all those positive words, and the market took off. >> absolutely. i was watching the body language when they finished up. they walked together. they didn't separate. the market kept making gains. it was that immediate. >> mark, do you agree? >> yeah, i think it was important. we've been looking for good news. the fact that everyone's heels aren't dug in quite as badly, it's good news and what otherwise has been a b
and overspending problem and not an under taxing problem. we heard from speaker john boehner. he said that revenue is on the table. the issue here is that president obama has said he wants to increase tax rates on wealthy americans. the speaker and house republicans are still not on board with increasing tax rates, although perhaps closing some loopholes to raise some revenue, and even though there's a lot of kind of kumbaya going on here, suzanne, there's still a lot of tough work that needs to be done. they're still maybe punting on some of the important issues like tax reform and entitlement reform, but they'll be dealing with the fiscal cliff here in the near term. >> it's probably difficult to tell, but we see these pictures, and it's very common, right? you get about 30 seconds to see them all in a room together. they're patting each other on the back, smiling, and shaking hands, that kind of thick. do we have any sense of whether or not there were any different kind of tone or language when they were meeting behind closed doors that gives us a sense that maybe this is real? >> you know, i t
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)